Vishnevo (Wiszniew, Vishneva) | Minsk

/ The orthodox church in Vishnevo © Victoria Bahr- Yahad-In Unum Former Vishnevo Jewish cemetery    © Victoria Bahr- Yahad-In Unum Evguenia R. remembers that local people took the Jews’ furniture after the liquidation of the ghetto    © Victoria Bahr- Yahad-In Unum Maria T. remembers that local policemen were very cruel to the Jews. © Victoria Bahr- Yahad-In Unum Monument to the Jews who were burnt alive in Vishnevo    © Victoria Bahr- Yahad-In Unum

To access full (non-subtitled) videos of witness testimony for a village, please visit the Registered users area

Execution of Jews in Vishnevo

2 Execution site(s)

Kind of place before :
Jewish cemetery/Buildings
Memorials :
Yes
Period of occupation:
1941 - 1944
Number of victims :
1000

Witness interview

Maria T., born in 1927, remembers: " When the first Germans arrived on motorcycles in the village, 3 Jews came to welcome them with bunches of flowers. They still did not suspect what was going to happen to them later...” (Eyewitness N°720 interviewed in April 2014)

Historical note

Vishnevo is a village situated 90 km northwest of Minsk. On the eve of the WWII, there was a significant Jewish population living in the village, as there was a wooden synagogue and a Jewish cemetery. According to the sources, about 700 Jews lived in the village. From 1939 to 1941, as the territory was overtaken by the Soviets, the Jewish population increased up to 2,000 as Jewish refugees arrived from occupied Poland. Vishnevo is the hometown of Shimon Peres. The village was occupied by German forces at the end of July.

Holocaust by bullets in figures

Through historical documentation, little is known about the fate of the Jews in Vishnevo during WWII, but thanks to local testimonies collected by Yahad, we have been able to establish some of what happened to them. A short time after the Germans’ arrival, the Jews were gathered in a fenced-in quarter of the village. The Jewish men were sometimes forced to work, performing labor such as cleaning the streets.

In summer 1942, dozens of Jewish men were killed by Germans in a pit in the Jewish cemetery, dug by the Jews themselves.

During the liquidation of the ghetto, the Jews were locked in several houses, the Germans threw oil on the houses and set fire to them. The victims were burnt alive. Witnesses remember that the smoke lasted several days. Their bodies were then buried on the spot in mass graves by requisitioned inhabitants. Furniture and Jewish belongings were looted.

Other links

Nearby villages

Do you have additional information regarding a village that you would like to share with Yahad ?

Please contact us at contact@yahadinunum.org
or by calling Yahad – In Unum at +33 (0) 1 53 20 13 17